scattered the forced relocation of poland s ukrainians after world war ii

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Scattered

Author : Diana Howansky Reilly
ISBN : 9780299293437
Genre : History
File Size : 20. 10 MB
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Following World War II, the communist government of Poland forcibly relocated the country's Ukrainian minority by means of a Soviet-Polish population exchange and then a secretly planned action code-named Operation Vistula. In Scattered, Diana Howansky Reilly recounts these events through the experiences of three siblings caught up in the conflict, during a turbulent period when compulsory resettlement was a common political tactic used against national minorities to create homogenous states. Born in the Lemko region of southeastern Poland, Petro, Melania, and Hania Pyrtej survived World War II only to be separated by political decisions over which they had no control. Petro relocated with his wife to Soviet Ukraine during the population exchange of 1944–46, while his sisters Melania and Hania were resettled to western Poland through Operation Vistula in 1947. As the Ukrainian Insurgent Army fought resettlement, the Polish government meanwhile imprisoned suspected sympathizers within the Jaworzno concentration camp. Melania, Reilly's maternal grandmother, eventually found her way to the United States during Poland's period of liberalization in the 1960s. Drawing on oral interviews and archival research, Reilly tells a fascinating, true story that provides a bottom-up perspective and illustrates the impact of extraordinary historical events on the lives of ordinary people. Tracing the story to the present, she describes survivors' efforts to receive compensation for the destruction of their homes and communities. Silver Medal for World History, Independent Publisher Book Awards Finalist, Housatonic Book Awards Finalist in History, Foreword Books of the Year

Scattered

Author : Diana Howansky Reilly
ISBN : 0299293408
Genre : History
File Size : 34. 24 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
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Following World War II, the communist government of Poland forcibly relocated the country's Ukrainian minority by means of a Soviet-Polish population exchange and then a secretly planned action code-named Operation Vistula. In Scattered, Diana Howansky Reilly recounts these events through the experiences of three siblings caught up in the conflict, during a turbulent period when compulsory resettlement was a common political tactic used against national minorities to create homogenous states. Born in the Lemko region of southeastern Poland, Petro, Melania, and Hania Pyrtej survived World War II only to be separated by political decisions over which they had no control. Petro relocated with his wife to Soviet Ukraine during the population exchange of 1944–46, while his sisters Melania and Hania were resettled to western Poland through Operation Vistula in 1947. As the Ukrainian Insurgent Army fought resettlement, the Polish government meanwhile imprisoned suspected sympathizers within the Jaworzno concentration camp. Melania, Reilly's maternal grandmother, eventually found her way to the United States during Poland's period of liberalization in the 1960s. Drawing on oral interviews and archival research, Reilly tells a fascinating, true story that provides a bottom-up perspective and illustrates the impact of extraordinary historical events on the lives of ordinary people. Tracing the story to the present, she describes survivors' efforts to receive compensation for the destruction of their homes and communities.

Ukrainian Otherlands

Author : Natalia Khanenko-Friesen
ISBN : 9780299303440
Genre : History
File Size : 51. 26 MB
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Exploring a rich array of folk traditions that developed in the Ukrainian diaspora and in Ukraine during the twentieth century, "Ukrainian Otherlands" is an innovative exploration of modern ethnic identity and the deeply felt (but sometimes deeply different) understandings of ethnicity in homeland and diaspora.

Ukraine

Author : Orest Subtelny
ISBN : 9781442697287
Genre : History
File Size : 58. 64 MB
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In 1988, the first edition of Orest Subtelny's Ukraine was published to international acclaim, as the definitive history of what was at that time a republic in the USSR. In the years since, the world has seen the dismantling of the Soviet bloc and the restoration of Ukraine's independence - an event celebrated by Ukrainians around the world but which also heralded a time of tumultuous change for those in the homeland. While previous updates brought readers up to the year 2000, this new fourth edition includes an overview of Ukraine's most recent history, focusing on the dramatic political, socio-economic, and cultural changes that occurred during the Kuchma and Yushchenko presidencies. It analyzes political developments - particularly the so-called Orange Revolution - and the institutional growth of the new state. Subtelny examines Ukraine's entry into the era of globalization, looking at social and economic transformations, regional, ideological, and linguistic tensions, and describes the myriad challenges currently facing Ukrainian state and society.

Not So Strange Bedfellows

Author : Jim Jose
ISBN : 9781443865845
Genre : Religion
File Size : 54. 15 MB
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At the intersection of politics and religion is a nexus of belief in doctrine and adherence to socio-political cultural conventions. Lines of communication and methods of belonging permeate both spheres, enabling their respective participants, especially the (often self-described) ‘true believers’, to bond and belong, and most importantly to adhere to their various belief systems. Traditionally, this nexus has been approached from a standpoint that posits the idea of secularity as the governing principle. The authors in this volume challenge this orthodoxy. They examine a diverse range of historical and geographic locations involving markedly different religious and political movements. They explore how nation-states develop political religions, how they actively promote a politics infused with religiosity, and how they transfer symbols and meanings from one socio-political construct to another. Despite markedly different philosophical differences, the contributors repudiate the currently dominant orthodoxies on the relationship between religion and politics. They demonstrate that ‘secular’ democracy is not radically separate from religion. Nation-states actively participate in the construction of this nexus even as they extol their commitment to secular values. In so doing, they demonstrate that secularity as it is currently understood remains deeply implicated in the nexus between religion and politics in the twenty-first century.

Handbook To Life In Renaissance Europe

Author : Sandra Sider
ISBN : 9780816074860
Genre : History
File Size : 65. 96 MB
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Examines architecture and design, dance, fashion, literature, music, philosophy, religion, theater and visual arts in Europe between 1300 and 1600.

The Art Of Not Being Governed

Author : James C. Scott
ISBN : 9780300156522
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 57. 49 MB
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For two thousand years the disparate groups that now reside in Zomia (a mountainous region the size of Europe that consists of portions of seven Asian countries) have fled the projects of the organized state societies that surround them--slavery, conscription, taxes, corvee labor, epidemics, and warfare. This book, essentially an anarchist history, is the first-ever examination of the huge literature on state-making whose author evaluates why people would deliberately and reactively remain stateless. Among the strategies employed by the people of Zomia to remain stateless are physical dispersion in rugged terrain; agricultural practices that enhance mobility; pliable ethnic identities; devotion to prophetic, millenarian leaders; and maintenance of a largely oral culture that allows them to reinvent their histories and genealogies as they move between and around states. In accessible language, James Scott, recognized worldwide as an eminent authority in Southeast Asian, peasant, and agrarian studies, tells the story of the peoples of Zomia and their unlikely odyssey in search of self-determination. He redefines our views on Asian politics, history, demographics, and even our fundamental ideas about what constitutes civilization, and challenges us with a radically different approach to history that presents events from the perspective of stateless peoples and redefines state-making as a form of internal colonialism. This new perspective requires a radical reevaluation of the civilizational narratives of the lowland states. Scott's work on Zomia represents a new way to think of area studies that will be applicable to other runaway, fugitive, and marooned communities, be they Gypsies, Cossacks, tribes fleeing slave raiders, Marsh Arabs, or San-Bushmen.

Yalta

Author : S. M. Plokhy
ISBN : 9781101189924
Genre : History
File Size : 89. 69 MB
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A major new history of the eight days in February 1945 when FDR, Churchill, and Stalin decided the fate of the world Imagine you could eavesdrop on a dinner party with three of the most fascinating historical figures of all time. In this landmark book, a gifted Harvard historian puts you in the room with Churchill, Stalin, and Roosevelt as they meet at a climactic turning point in the war to hash out the terms of the peace. The ink wasn't dry when the recriminations began. The conservatives who hated Roosevelt's New Deal accused him of selling out. Was he too sick? Did he give too much in exchange for Stalin's promise to join the war against Japan? Could he have done better in Eastern Europe? Both Left and Right would blame Yalta for beginning the Cold War. Plokhy's conclusions, based on unprecedented archival research, are surprising. He goes against conventional wisdom-cemented during the Cold War- and argues that an ailing Roosevelt did better than we think. Much has been made of FDR's handling of the Depression; here we see him as wartime chief. Yalta is authoritative, original, vividly- written narrative history, and is sure to appeal to fans of Margaret MacMillan's bestseller Paris 1919.

Ukrainian Genealogy

Author : John D. Pihach
ISBN : 1894865057
Genre : Reference
File Size : 79. 12 MB
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John D. Pihach's Ukrainian Genealogy is a guide to tracing one's Ukrainian ancestry in Europe. Consideration is given, however, to North American records that are specifically Ukrainian or relate to the immigrant experience.

A Problem From Hell

Author : Samantha Power
ISBN : 9780061120145
Genre : History
File Size : 48. 16 MB
Format : PDF
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In her award-winning interrogation of the last century of American history, Samantha Power—a former Balkan war correspondent and founding executive director of Harvard's Carr Center for Human Rights Policy—asks the haunting question: Why do American leaders who vow "never again" repeatedly fail to stop genocide? Drawing upon exclusive interviews with Washington's top policy makers, access to newly declassified documents, and her own reporting from the modern killing fields, Power provides the answer in "A Problem from Hell," a groundbreaking work that tells the stories of the courageous Americans who risked their careers and lives in an effort to get the United States to act.

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